Rules Of Penny Auctions

If you want to get the most from the best penny auction sites, then it is essential to understand the rules of penny auctions on each site you visit. Each site you join in on the auctions at is different, has its own rules, charges different amounts for bids and lets you do different things with your already spent bids if you don’t win the item you were bidding on.

These penny auction sites come and go fairly often. In fact, there are some 112 of these sites that I could find by just doing a quick search on Google and looking at various lists that other people have made. But just because there are many sites where you can get great bargains on computers, iPads, iPods, iPhones, televisions and all kids of other electronics and gift cards and such, doesn’t mean that you want to try and keep up with lots of sites and the things that are being auctioned on them.

The best way to be able to follow the rules on these sites and not get them confused with the rules on another site is to only join a few of the top sites that have been around the longest and have the best reputations. DealFun.com is one of the better known sites that charges $0.6o per bid and has lots of auctions going on at any given time.

The rules at DealFun.com are fairly simple, as they should be for any penny bid site. First of all you have to join Deal Fun to be able to bid, you then have to buy bids which you can do by purchasing them from the site in bid packs of from 50 bids to 250 bids. You can also bid on bid pack auctions, but you must first purchase bids because you can bid on any auction without having any bids in your possession.

Other penny auction rules at DealFun.com are that bid will go up by 1 cent at a time. Auctions are all supposed to go up 1 cents at a time, but at Deal Fun this doesn’t always happen because they allow bidders from more than 6 countries to bid on items and not every currency in the world translates easily into 1 cent increments. You can also use Bid Buddy on most auctions and they are similar to the way eBay lets you put in your top bid, but doesn’t go to that amount until the next highest bidder is just a few cents away from your bid. Bid Buddy allow you to set a maximum amount of bids you will place on an item.

One of the most important rules to remember at Deal Fun is that if you do lose an item you had placed bids on, you can buy the item at retail price minus the cost of your bids. So let’s say you want an iPad and the retail price is $499 and let’s say you’ve placed 25 bids at a cost of $0.60 each, that would be $15. If you want, you can then purchase that iPad for $482.75. So the message here is to not bid on stuff you don’t want. Only bid on stuff that you are already shopping for, then if you don’t win that item, you can still buy it and you haven’t lost any money.

There are many different rules at all these sites, more than I can list here, so make sure you read all of them before placing bids so you know how things work.

Follow these simple rules of penny auctions and get some incredible deals.